Biological & Innovative Researchers

Qitao Ran, Ph.D.

Research surrounds the exploration of mitochondria. Mitochondria are organelles with multiple functions essential for neural activities and the dysfunction of which is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, especially for sporadic and late-onset cases. Research focuses to illustrate the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in relation to Alzheimer’s disease and aging, with a goal of identifying novel targets for prevention and treatment of the disease.

Research Areas
Biological & Innovative Research

Contact:
Ran@uthscsa.edu
Research Profile

Nicolas Musi, M.D.

Research expertise is in aging, insulin resistance and exercise physiology. Research program in metabolic/endocrine gerontology, is devoted to exploring the effects that aging has on numerous metabolic and cellular processes, and relevant to the patho-genesis of age-related diseases such as diabetes, obesity and sarcopenia. Clinical interests include pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of diabetes in the elderly, molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia of aging and effects of exercise on glucose and lipid metabolism at the whole-body and cellular levels.

Research Areas
Biological & Innovative Research

Contact:
Musi@uthscsa.edu
Research Profile

James D. Lechleiter, Ph.D.



Research Areas
Biological & Innovative Research


Sarah C. Hopp, Ph.D.

Research focuses on microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system, and how these cells are involved in Alzheimer’s disease and other age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia changes during aging, in Alzheimer’s disease and chronic neuroinflammation. A main research objective is to understand how these changes contribute to the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits. One line of research focuses on microglia interaction with tau pathology. Misfolded tau accumulates and spreads during Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and recent evidence from the laboratory suggests that microglia contribute to the spread of tau pathology via dysfunctional degradation of tau. A second line of research focuses on how microglia intracellular calcium dysregulation in the context of Alzheimer’s pathology alters normal microglia processes and contributes to their dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease. A particular interest is differentiating cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous effects of manipulating microglia in vivo. A variety of methods are utilized to address these research goals including transgenic animal models, behavior analyses, cell culture, imaging, protein biochemistry, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and pharmacological and genetic manipulation of microglia-specific pathways.

Research Areas
Biological & Innovative Research

Contact:
hopps1@uthscsa.edu
Research Profile